Butterfly Habitat Network – Focus on Klots’ Bog


(Georgia Satyr photographed by Jeffrey Glassberg in 2010 at Klots’ bog)

Today we are going to take a closer look at the three species that we will be targeting as part of the Butterfly Habitat Network’s potential satellite location in the Lakehurst, Ocean County, New Jersey area, Klots’ Bog. Want to help us preserve these species through direct land management? Join or Donate today!

http://naba.org/chapters/nabanj/sites/lakehurst.html

Named after entomologist Alexander B. Klots, author of Butterflies of the World this habitat is described via this great post by Rick over at Lep Log: https://leplog.wordpress.com/2011/07/03/wading-through-lep-history-at-klots-bog/.

(Female Bog Copper, photographed by Jeffrey Glassberg at Klots’ Bog in 2010)

Lycaena epixanthe is a member of the Lycaenidae family, and loves the environment that the bog provides. You can learn more about them on the New Jersey chapter page:

http://www.naba.org/chapters/nabanj/butterflies/bog_copper.html

(Two-spotted Skipper photographed by Tom Murray in 2004)

Euphyes bimacula is notable for its strong orange appearance and enjoys wetlands like the bog. The Massachusetts NABA chapter has more information:

http://www.naba.org/chapters/nabambc/construct-species-page.asp?sp=two-spotted-skipper

(Georgia Saytr photographed by Tom Palmer earlier this year)

Neonympha areolatus is our third and final species of special concern in this landscape. Its eyespots are a major feature when identifying this species; you can learn more about them on the New Jersey NABA chapter page:

http://www.naba.org/chapters/nabanj/butterflies/georgia_satyr.html

Georgia Satyr at Lakehurst bonus: https://blogs.stockton.edu/sjbfs/2011/06/26/and-now-we-have-81/

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